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Daryl M. Berke

Associate

[email protected]

+1.202.434.7410

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Daryl advises on compliance matters pertaining to federal and state health law statutes and represents clients in health law matters before state and federal courts.

He has counseled clients on transactional and regulatory issues relating to the Beneficiary Inducement Prohibition, federal and state anti-kickback statutes, the Stark Law, and Medicaid and managed care reimbursement. He conducts regulatory analyses on health care transactions and regularly reviews and drafts hospital affiliation agreements, provider group agreements, and managed care contracts.

Prior to joining Mintz, Daryl was an associate in a DC-area law firm with a significant focus on health law. While attending law school, he served as an articles editor for the American Journal of Law & Medicine and as an intern with the Children’s Disability Project at Greater Boston Legal Services, where he assisted with Supplemental Security Income appeals for low-income families of children with disabilities.

Education

  • Boston University School of Law (JD)
  • Yale University (MPH)
  • Hamilton College (BA)

Viewpoints

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CMS Proposes Additional Cuts to Part B Reimbursement of 340B Drugs

August 7, 2020 | Blog | By Ellyn Sternfield, Daryl Berke

On August 4th, the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) published the 2021 Hospital Outpatient Prospective Payment System (OPPS) proposed rule. The rule proposes to cut Medicare Part B reimbursement for 340B drugs by an additional 6% in 2021 and comes days after the D.C. Court of Appeals upheld a 340B rate reduction of nearly 30% in the 2018, 2019, and 2020 OPPS rules. The agency is relying on data collected through a recent 340B acquisition cost survey to justify the additional rate reduction.
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340B Rate Cuts Are Legal, D.C. Circuit Court Holds

August 4, 2020 | Blog | By Ellyn Sternfield, Daryl Berke

This week, the Friday surprise came courtesy of the D.C. Court of Appeals. In a long-awaited split decision, the court ruled that the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) acted lawfully when it reduced Medicare Part B reimbursement to hospitals for 340B drugs by nearly 30%. The reduction in Part B reimbursement was originally proposed in the 2018 Outpatient Prospective Payment Services (OPPS) rule. HHS estimated it would reduce total Part B spending by $1.6 billion annually, and save Medicare beneficiaries millions in copayments. Covered entities sued to overturn the rate cut, and litigation has been ongoing since the rate cut was implemented in early 2018.
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Trump Administration Releases Series of Executive Orders on Drug Pricing

July 27, 2020 | Blog | By Xavier Hardy, Daryl Berke

The Trump Administration issued a series of Executive Orders (“EOs” or “Orders”) Friday afternoon related to drug pricing.  Several of the EOs seek to restart stalled or withdrawn policy initiatives previously announced by the Administration.  Brief summaries of the EOs are below, and we will provide more detailed analysis this week.
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On July 2, a bipartisan group of six senators introduced legislation to waive 340B eligibility requirements for hospitals participating in the program during the COVID-19 pandemic. S. 4160 permits hospitals that are 340B-eligible based on their disproportionate share (“DSH”) adjustment percentage to maintain eligibility even if their DSH adjustment percentage falls below the requisite threshold.
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Five Suggested Updates for 340B Covered Entities Facing COVID-19 Challenges

April 2, 2020 | Blog | By Ellyn Sternfield, Daryl Berke

The Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) recently published guidance regarding the evolving impact of COVID-19 on 340B stakeholders. This new guidance is one part of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services’ broader effort to maximize regulatory flexibility for health care providers scrambling to meet patient needs during the COVID-19 crisis. While HRSA’s new guidance begins by acknowledging “it is appropriate to take into account the realities of the COVID-19,” HRSA offers little in the way of substantive relief when it comes to 340B. Long on generalities and short on specifics, HRSA merely advises entities to ensure they “have policies and procedures in place to address the proper dispensing of 340B drugs.”
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As regular readers of our blog know, the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) intensified its push for drug pricing transparency in 2019. In 2020, we see a continuation of those efforts, and their impacts on the 340B program are now starting to reveal themselves. On January 1, 2019, the Health Resources & Services Administration (HRSA) finally implemented the ceiling price and manufacturer civil monetary penalties (CMPs) regulations that the agency proposed in 2017. The regulations implement certain provisions of the Affordable Care Act and were initially scheduled to go into effect on February 28, 2017, but were repeatedly delayed.
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On December 16, 2019, a nationwide coalition of hospitals sued HHS to block implementation of the 340B rate cuts contained in the 2020 Hospital Outpatient Prospective Payment System (“OPPS”) Final Rule. As detailed in our prior blog post, the 2020 OPPS Final Rule reduces by nearly 30% the Medicare Part B reimbursement for certain drugs provided by hospitals to outpatient beneficiaries that are acquired through the 340B Program. The final rule purports to continue the reimbursement cuts for 340B drugs first implemented in 2018, despite the fact that those cuts (and the 2019 OPPS rule continuing those cuts) are the subject of ongoing litigation in which the cuts were determined to be unlawful. For a detailed walk-through of the 2020 OPPS Final Rule and litigation up to this point, please see our prior three blog posts here, here, and here. 
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The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) recently published the 2020 Hospital Outpatient Prospective Payment System (OPPS) rule, which finalizes a proposed reduction in Medicare Part B reimbursement for certain drugs provided by hospitals to outpatient beneficiaries that are acquired through the 340B drug discount program. Through the final rule, CMS purports to continue Medicare reimbursement cuts for 340B drugs first implemented in 2018, despite the fact that those cuts (and the 2019 OPPS rule continuing those cuts) are the subject of ongoing litigation in which the cuts were determined to be unlawful. That ruling, and a Court-imposed stay of the cuts, are the subject of a just-argued appeal.  For a detailed walk-through of the litigation up to this point, please see our prior blog post.
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Key Takeaways from CMS’s Final Rule Requiring the Disclosure of Affiliates during Provider Enrollment

September 12, 2019 | Blog | By Daryl Berke, Sarah Beth Kuyers, Karen Lovitch

The Centers for Medicare & Medicare Services (CMS) recently published a final rule with comment period (the “Final Rule”) that is designed to increase CMS’s ability to identify and prevent bad actors from participating in Medicare, Medicaid, and CHIP. Providers and suppliers should take note because implementation will be costly and burdensome. Among other things, the Final Rule requires the disclosure of certain provider and supplier affiliations and permits CMS to revoke or deny enrollment where those affiliations pose an undue risk of fraud and abuse. The Final Rule also grants CMS several additional authorities to revoke or deny a provider’s Medicare enrollment and increases the duration of such revocations and denials. The Final Rule takes effect on November 4, 2019. Comments on the Final Rule are due by 5:00 p.m. on that same day.
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On July 11, 2019, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) issued its Home Health Prospective Payment System proposed rule for 2020. The proposed rule implements a previously finalized reimbursement methodology for Home Health Agencies (HHAs) called the Patient-Driven Groupings Model (PDGM). The proposal reflects CMS’s continued efforts to shift towards value-based payment models in the Medicare program.
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