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Elizabeth K. Conti

Associate

[email protected]

+1.202.434.7317

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Elizabeth focuses her practice on regulatory compliance and enforcement defense matters for companies in the pharmaceuticals, medical device, dietary supplement, cosmetics, and food industries as well as pharmacies and distributors.

She advises clients on FDA regulations related to labeling, advertising, importing and exporting, and manufacturing practices. Her practice also encompasses administrative matters and civil litigation related to DEA requirements. On the enforcement defense side of her practice, Elizabeth counsels clients on fraud and abuse compliance and litigation involving the False Claims Act, the Stark law, and the federal anti-kickback statute.

Prior to joining Mintz, Elizabeth was a health law associate in the Washington office of a Wisconsin-based national law firm, where she assisted clients with a wide range of FDA, DEA, and health care fraud and abuse enforcement matters. Earlier, she was a winter associate at that firm.

While earning her law degree, Elizabeth also completed a clerkship at the White House Council on Environmental Quality and internships with the Environmental Protection Agency’s Office of the General Counsel and Office of Enforcement and Compliance Assurance. At law school, she served as a note & comment editor of the Catholic University Law Review.

* Not admitted to practice in the District of Columbia. Working under the supervision and guidance of members of the Bar of the District of Columbia. Admitted to practice in the State of Maryland only.

Education

  • Catholic University of America (JD, cum laude)
  • George Washington University (BA, magna cum laude)

Involvement

  • Member, American Society of Pharmacy Law
  • Member, American Bar Association
  • Member, Women's Bar Association of the District of Columbia
  • Member, Bar Association of Montgomery County Maryland

Languages

- German

Viewpoints

On May 10, 2019, the Food and Drug Administration issued highly anticipated final guidance that gives drug-makers more clarity on how to demonstrate that a proposed biosimilar product meets the statutory interchangeability standard under the Public Health Service Act (PHS Act or the Act). According to the Act, an interchangeable biosimilar may be substituted for the original biological product without the involvement of a prescriber, similar to the way generic drugs are routinely substituted for brand name drugs at the pharmacy level. The Final Guidance, entitled “Considerations in Demonstrating Interchangeability with a Reference Product,” is shorter than the draft version released over two years ago, in response to industry feedback, but generally tracks the original policy positions proposed in the draft, with a few notable exceptions summarized below.
Viewpoint General
FDA's Comprehensive Regenerative Medicine Policy Framework is nearing the halfway mark of the “grace period” the Agency extended for certain regenerative medicine product developers to come into compliance by obtaining investigational new drug applications (INDs) and working towards premarket approval of their products.