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Charles W. Azano

Special Counsel

[email protected]

+1.617.348.1843

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Chip specializes in Chapter 11 bankruptcy reorganizations and out-of-court restructurings. He has represented debtors, secured and unsecured creditors, creditors’ committees, bondholders, indenture trustees, bankruptcy trustees, and liquidating trustees in all aspects of Chapter 7, Chapter 11, and other insolvency proceedings. He frequently works on senior living and health care distressed matters.

During law school, Chip was an executive editor of the Uniform Commercial Code Reporter Digest, and later served as a law clerk to the Honorable Joel B. Rosenthal of the US Bankruptcy Court for the District of Massachusetts. Chip is very involved with professional and community organizations, speaks and writes on bankruptcy matters, and contributes to the Firm’s pro bono and activities and mentoring programs.

Education

  • Boston College (JD)
  • Colgate University (BA)

Recognition & Awards

  • Massachusetts Super Lawyers: Rising Star – Bankruptcy & Creditor/Debtor Rights (2006 – 2013)

Involvement

  • Member, Boston Bar Association Bankruptcy Section
  • Member, American Bankruptcy Institute
  • Member, Massachusetts Bar Association

Viewpoints

It is not unusual for a creditor of a debtor to cry foul that a non-debtor affiliate has substantial assets, but has not joined the bankruptcy.
Last week, President Trump unveiled his proposal to fix our nation’s aging infrastructure. While the proposal lauded $1.5 trillion in new spending, it only included $200 billion in federal funding.
Last week, President Trump unveiled his proposal to fix our nation’s aging infrastructure. While the proposal lauded $1.5 trillion in new spending, it only included $200 billion in federal funding. To bridge this sizable gap, the plan largely relies on public private partnerships (often referred to as P3s) that can use tax-exempt bond financing.
There are numerous reasons why a company might use more than one entity for its operations or organization: to silo liabilities, for tax advantages, to accommodate a lender, or for general organizational purposes. Simply forming a separate entity, however, is not enough.