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Harold S. Laidlaw

Associate

[email protected]

+1.212.692.6221

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Harold’s practice focuses on intellectual property and patent litigation. He has experience in a broad range of technology areas.

Prior to joining the firm, Harold worked as an associate in the IP Litigation Group at a global law firm in New York. He focused primarily on patent litigation with an emphasis on technical subject matter in computing and software.

During law school, Harold served as notes editor to the Annual Survey of American Law and as a legal volunteer at a nonprofit digital library in San Francisco. In addition, as a research assistant to two professors at the law school, he researched and drafted memoranda on technology-related topics.

Earlier, Harold worked as a software development engineer, designing and developing infrastructure software used to support millions of users.

Education

  • New York University (JD)
  • Princeton University (BA)

Languages

- French

Recent Insights

News & Press

Viewpoints

In a widely anticipated move with implications for patent litigation across the country, the Supreme Court ruled today that the equitable defense of laches is not available to limit damages in patent infringement cases subject to the six-year damages limitation of 35 U.S.C. § 286.
Think you’ve won on validity at the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office’s Patent Trial and Appeal Board (PTAB) and your claims are safe on appeal? “Not so fast,” says the Federal Circuit in Software Rights Archive, LLC v. Facebook Inc., Nos. 2015-1649 through 2015-1563 (Fed. Cir., Sep. 9, 2016) (nonprecedential) (per curiam).
When it comes to Enfish, the PTAB may have just indicated that it prefers to cut bait. In Informatica Corp. v. Protegrity Corp., CBM2015-0021 (May 31, 2016), the PTAB held that U.S. Patent No 6,321,201 was void under Alice despite the Federal Circuit’s recent holding in Enfish v. Microsoft.

News & Press

This column, co-authored by Mintz’s Harold Laidlaw and Gurneet Singh, addresses the problem-solution approach to patent drafting examination in major economies abroad, as well as how recent court decisions encourage U.S. patent prosecutors to adopt similar approaches.