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Jennifer R. Budoff

Associate

[email protected]

+1.202.434.7381

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Jennifer provides clients with representation and counsel on a broad range of employment matters. She has significant experience defending employers in discrimination, retaliation, harassment, and wrongful termination claims in state and federal court, including the representation of employers in actions before Administrative Agencies.

In addition, Jennifer has substantial experience counseling management and human resource professionals on a broad range of workplace issues. In this regard, she regularly advises clients on best practices to minimize the risk of litigation and exposure, including monitoring and advising on changing employment legislation, and providing training for managers and employees on sexual harassment and discrimination in the workplace.

Jennifer also conducts internal investigations related to employment misconduct issues, prepares and updates employment policies and handbooks, negotiates employment and severance agreements, and assists in reductions in force and the onboarding of new employees.

Prior to joining Mintz, Jennifer was senior counsel in the Washington, DC and New York offices of a large law firm where she practiced employment law, commercial litigation, and professional liability.

Education

  • New York Law School (JD, cum laude)
  • New York University (BA, with distinction)

Involvement

  • Member, McInerney Inns of Court
  • Member, DRI Young Lawyers Committee and Employment Law Committee
  • Member, New York State Bar Association
  • Member, Regional Development Fund Board, American Kidney Fund
  • Past volunteer, DOROT

Recent Insights

News & Press

Viewpoints

Employers with workers in Massachusetts will have a lot to do between now and October 1, 2018, when reforms to Massachusetts non-compete laws go into effect.
The Massachusetts restrictive covenant legal landscape is set to shift dramatically with a new law limiting the use and enforcement of non-competition agreements by employers – effective October 1. In a post on our Mintz teammates’ Employment Blog, they review the new law’s requirements, discuss the legal and practical implications of the law, and outline action items for employers.
Non-compete reform has come to Massachusetts, with wide-ranging legal and practical implications for any employers with workers in Massachusetts. Employers have just six weeks to consider and adopt a new approach to non-compete agreements for their workforces.
On May 15, 2018, Governor Hogan signed into law the “Disclosing Sexual Harassment in the Workplace Act of 2018” (the “Act”). The Act will go into effect on October 1, 2018, and contains two new obligations with which Maryland employers will need to comply.
In a landmark opinion on an important issue to employers, the Supreme Court held yesterday that employers can enforce class action waivers in arbitration agreements – leaving employers nationwide asking “what does this decision mean for us?”  This post aims to answer that question.
Last week, the U.S. Supreme Court declined to review a decision by the Seventh Circuit Court of Appeals holding that a multi-month leave of absence is beyond the scope of a reasonable accommodation under the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA).
On March 6, 2018, the U.S. Department of Labor (“DOL”) announced a new pilot program, the Payroll Audit Independent Determination (“PAID”) program, which encourages employers to self-report inadvertent overtime and minimum wage violations under the Fair Labor Standards Act (“FLSA”).
Many state legislatures spent 2017 tinkering with post-employment covenants.  Given the growing trend to legislate locally and the employee mobility issues that seem to nag every employer, we thought the New Year would be a perfect time to review and revisit your post-employment covenants.

News & Press

This column discusses the impact of the U.S. Supreme Court’s decision in Epic v. Lewis which addressed a long debated issue – can employers require that workplace disputes be litigated in individual arbitrations or should employees always have the option to bring class action claims in court. The column is authored by a team of Employment, Labor & Benefits attorneys including Member Kate Beattie and Associates Jennifer Budoff and Brendan Lowd.