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Katharine O. Beattie

Member

[email protected]

+1.617.348.4445

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Kate’s work primarily involves litigation and counseling on federal and state labor and employment matters, including issues involving discrimination and harassment, leaves of absence, wage and hour disputes on an individual and class-wide basis, employee classification, wrongful termination, trade secret protection, and the enforcement of noncompetition and nondisclosure agreements.

Kate handles employment litigation before federal and state courts, arbitrators, and administrative agencies, including state fair employment and human rights agencies. She has also represented clients in cases pertaining to the False Claims Act, insider trading, and shareholder disputes.

Kate also counsels clients on a wide variety of employment issues, such as leaves of absence, independent contractor and employee classification, wage and hour law compliance, reasonable accommodation for disabled employees, employee discipline and terminations, and the protection of trade secrets and confidential information. She manages and conducts internal investigations of harassment and discrimination claims, wage and hour compliance issues, whistleblower claims, and allegations of ethics and code of conduct violations. She also provides training on anti-discrimination and anti-harassment policies and procedures as well as effective management practices.

Kate frequently provides employment and labor guidance on corporate merger and acquisition transactions, and regularly negotiates and drafts executive employment, separation, and related agreements on behalf of both publicly and privately held companies.

In her labor practice, she advises clients on a range of collective bargaining issues, and represents clients before the National Labor Relations Board with respect to unfair labor practice charges and union election proceedings.

Prior to rejoining the firm in October 2016, Kate was Vice President, Employment & Litigation Counsel at NTT DATA, Inc., a global IT services company which provides professional services, including consulting, application services, business process and IT outsourcing, and cloud-based solutions. In this role, which spanned across North America and in India, Kate managed commercial and employment litigations, provided human resources and business executives with employment law advice and counseling on all aspects of employment law, handled internal investigations, training, and compliance, and supported all phases of corporate merger and acquisition transactions.

From October 2006 through mid-2013, Kate was an Associate at Mintz. In law school, Kate served as a Special Assistant Attorney General in the Massachusetts Office of the Attorney General’s Office, where she represented state agencies before state courts. Her experience also includes four years as a legislative aide in the Massachusetts House of Representatives.

Education

  • Boston College (JD)
  • University of Massachusetts (MSPA)
  • College of the Holy Cross (BA)

Recognition & Awards

  • Included on the Massachusetts Super Lawyers List (2018)
  • Board Member, Read to a Child, Boston Regional Board
  • Alumna, Boston Chamber of Commerce Women’s Leadership Program (2010 – 2011)

Recent Insights

News & Press

Viewpoints

The Massachusetts restrictive covenant legal landscape is set to shift dramatically with a new law limiting the use and enforcement of non-competition agreements by employers – effective October 1. In a post on our Mintz teammates’ Employment Blog, they review the new law’s requirements, discuss the legal and practical implications of the law, and outline action items for employers.
Employers with workers in Massachusetts will have a lot to do between now and October 1, 2018, when reforms to Massachusetts non-compete laws go into effect.
Non-compete reform has come to Massachusetts, with wide-ranging legal and practical implications for any employers with workers in Massachusetts. Employers have just six weeks to consider and adopt a new approach to non-compete agreements for their workforces.
Employers in Massachusetts are watching closely as a non-compete bill was recently passed by the Legislature and is now on Governor Baker’s desk.
Our colleague Alden Bianchi was a guest on a recent episode of Bloomberg Tax’s “Talking Tax” podcast, discussing the U.S. Department of Labor’s new rules for Association Health Plan.
In a landmark opinion on an important issue to employers, the Supreme Court held yesterday that employers can enforce class action waivers in arbitration agreements – leaving employers nationwide asking “what does this decision mean for us?”  This post aims to answer that question.
As our readers know, we have been monitoring decisions regarding the ability of employers to take disciplinary action against employees for using marijuana at work (like this decision here).
Spurred by a recent change in a Massachusetts wage and hour regulation, plaintiffs’ attorneys are aggressively pursuing class action lawsuits seeking unpaid overtime premium pay on behalf of car salespeople across the Commonwealth.
The Federal Arbitration Act (“FAA”), 9 U.S.C. § 1, et seq., does not contain an express preemption provision, nor was it intended to be the exclusive codified arbitration law in all circumstances. However, the United States Supreme Court has repeatedly taught that where the FAA applies, it is deemed to supersede state laws that are inconsistent with its provisions and purposes.
As we discussed yesterday at Mintz Levin's Third Annual Employment Law Summit, big changes are likely in the offing as all three branches of our federal government begin to deal with labor and employment issues following President Trump’s election.

News & Press

This feature article discusses a new Massachusetts law focused noncompete employment agreements. The article looks at how this differs from previous noncompete laws and what the new law means for employers. Member Kate Beattie is quoted providing commentary.
This feature article discusses a new Massachusetts law focused noncompete employment agreements. The article looks at how this differs from previous noncompete laws and what the new law means for employers. Member Kate Beattie is quoted providing commentary.
This column discusses the impact of the U.S. Supreme Court’s decision in Epic v. Lewis which addressed a long debated issue – can employers require that workplace disputes be litigated in individual arbitrations or should employees always have the option to bring class action claims in court. The column is authored by a team of Employment, Labor & Benefits attorneys including Member Kate Beattie and Associates Jennifer Budoff and Brendan Lowd.
Mintz advised GPB Capital on its acquisition of a majority equity stake in Westwood, Massachusetts-based Prime Motor Group. The acquisition by Capstone Automotive Group, an affiliate of GPB, expands the group’s footprint throughout New England.
Kate Beattie, a Mintz Member, is quoted in a National Law Journal article on regulating marijuana use in the workplace. The article pays particular attention to places where the legality is especially hazy due to conflicting federal and state legalizations.
This article highlights the arrival of Kate Beattie, who joins Mintz's Employment, Labor & Benefits practice as a Member. Kate most recently was with global IT services company NTT DATA, Inc. where she served as Vice President, Employment & Litigation Counsel.
Mintz has bolstered its Employment, Labor & Benefits Practice with the addition of Kate Beattie, who returns to the firm from global IT services company NTT DATA, Inc. Ms. Beattie served as a Mintz Associate from 2006-2013 and re-joins as a Member in the Boston office.

Events

Speaker
Nov
7
2018

Boston Employment Law Summit

One Financial Center, Boston, MA

Panelist
May
10
2018

ASA Law Conference

American Staffing Association

Speaker
Mar
29
2017

New England Construction Risk Conference

Willis Towers Watson

Newton, MA