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Katie Weider

ML Strategies - Director of Health Policy

[email protected]

+1.212.692.6746

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Katie provides advice and guidance on issues relating to Medicaid, Medicare, and the Marketplace.

Prior to joining ML Strategies, Katie was a senior analyst with the Medicaid and CHIP Payment and Access Commission (MACPAC), a nonpartisan agency that provides Congress, the Secretary of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, and states with analysis and recommendations on issues affecting Medicaid and the State Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP). There Katie researched, developed, and prepared Medicaid policy recommendations; conducted legislative, data, and policy analyses related to a host of Medicaid and Medicare issues; and provided policy analyses and technical assistance for Congressional staff on draft bills and policy questions, among many other duties.

In her work at ML Strategies Katie helps navigate complex legislative, regulatory, and executive actions relating to Medicaid, Medicare, and the Marketplace. She helps clients determine the effects of state and federal action on client business models and helps clients develop comprehensive strategies. 

While earning her master’s degree in public health, Katie worked at the George Washington University leading the evaluation of HRSA’s Teaching Health Centers Graduate Medical Education program and also worked in the office of Senator Charles Grassley.

Publications
• Whitlock, R., Josephson, K., and Weider, K. 2017. How eliminating the medical expense deduction could increase Medicaid spending. Health Affairs. https://www.healthaffairs.org/do/10.1377/hblog20171114.518177/full
• Weider, K., and Whitlock, R. 2017. What’s CHIP got to do with it? Health Affairs.
https://www.healthaffairs.org/do/10.1377/hblog20170626.060790/full
• Whitlock, R. and Weider, K. 2017. Senators must address a critical stumbling block to changing Medicaid: State envy. Forbes. https://www.forbes.com/sites/realspin/2017/06/16/senators-must-address-a-critical- stumbling-block-to-changing-medicaid-state-envy/#58078a71531c
• Mullen, F., Salsberg, E., & Weider, K. 2015. Why a GME squeeze is unlikely. New England Journal of Medicine, 373:2397-2399. http://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJMp1511707#t=article
• Chen, C., Weider, K., Konopka, K., & Danis, M. 2014. Incorporation of socioeconomic status indictors into policies for the meaningful use of electronic health records. Journal for Health Care for the Poor Underserved 25, no. 1: 1- 16. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24509007

Education

  • George Washington University (MPH, Health Policy)
  • Boston University (BS)

Recent Insights

News & Press

Viewpoints

Viewpoint
This week, Congress returns to Washington for its lame duck session with uncertain expectations for what gets done between now and the next funding deadline of December 7, 2018. There are a number of legislative items that passed one chamber and not the other, and watch to see which bills make it across the finish line.
Viewpoint
All eyes are on Tuesday and what the midterm elections mean broadly and in the health care space. The implications are far reaching, from the House to the Senate, and even the gubernatorial races. Read the full post for links to our weekly preview and coverage of the elections.
Viewpoint
With the midterms in sight, our lame duck preview takes a look ahead at what the balance of the year will look like in health care. There are several legislative items that must be completed before closing out the 115th Congress, but there are also issues that could receive attention and that stakeholders need to keep on their radar.
Viewpoint
Open Enrollment is fast approaching and the landscape with be notably different than in years past. From the introduction of short-term plans and association health plans to proposals to allow for greater use of health reimbursement arrangements, the strength of the Marketplace will be tested and will inform future policy considerations. We cover this and more in this week's health care preview.
Viewpoint
On October 17th, the Administration released its semiannual forecast of the rules that the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) will be churning out over the next year. The list includes nearly 200 rules, 23 of which are already posted on the Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs (OIRA) dashboard. The bulk of the rules on the Agency Rule List for Fall are under the purview of CMS or the FDA (63 and 77 rules, respectively). Also, earlier in October, FDA’s device center released a list of draft and final guidance documents it plans to publish in FY 2019. Many of these rules or guidance documents touch on issues top of mind and we expect that the administration will be moving forward with many of these priorities in the coming months. 
Viewpoint
While Congress is in full campaign-mode, the Administration is continuing its regulatory push in the health space. On Monday, the Administration put forth new guidance on Section 1332 waivers. These waivers were created by the Affordable Care Act as a way for states to seek additional flexibility to pursue avenues for providing high quality and affordable health coverage. Today's guidance will put the Administration out front on interpreting state proposal's to drive innovation. We cover this and more in this week's health care preview.
Viewpoint
Congress has left town until after the midterm elections, but the Administration is continuing to advance its priorities in the regulatory arena. This week, the Administration is expected to publish the proposed rule, "Medicare and Medicaid Programs; Regulation to Require Drug Pricing Transparency." We cover this and the political implications in this week's health care preview.
Viewpoint
While the House is out on recess, the Senate continues to be in session. This week the Senate has some non-health care related hearings scheduled as well as nomination hearings. We are looking for signals for a deal to finish work and send vulnerable Senators home to campaign. However, while legislative action may begin to cool down, regulatory activity at OIRA could be heating up.
Viewpoint
On September 25, 2018, House and Senate negotiators agreed on a final legislative package to address the opioid crisis. Following this agreement, the House passed the opioid package on September 28, 2018. The Senate is expected to pass the package in the weeks ahead, and the President is expected to sign the package into law. ML Strategies has created a chart tracking the provision of the final opioid package.
Viewpoint
You might have missed it but Congress averted a government shutdown last week. While several appropriations bills passed on time for the first time in years, several agencies, including the FDA, were funded on a continuing resolution (CR). The CR provides funding until December 7th and will need to be addressed again by that time. However, the House is now in recess and won’t be back in town until after the midterm elections. So the lame duck session will have a few ‘must dos’ on the list.

News & Press

ML Strategies’ Rodney Whitlock, Kate Josephson, and Katie Weider collaborated on an article in Health Affairs. The article covers the announced tax reform plan at the end of 2017, focusing in particular on the elimination of the medical expense tax reduction from the bill.

Events

Panelist
Nov
7
2018

Boston Employment Law Summit

One Financial Center, Boston, MA