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Ryan T. Dougherty

Associate

[email protected]

+1.617.210.6849

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Ryan advises clients on complex litigation matters. 

While earning his law degree, Ryan was an intern at the Massachusetts Office of the Attorney General, where he represented state agencies and officials in state and federal courts as part of the Government Bureau’s Administrative Law Division. His experience included drafting pleadings, motions, and discovery requests; assisting attorneys defending depositions; and drafting legal memoranda on issues of administrative and constitutional law, federal courts, and statutory construction. Ryan was also a member of Boston College’s European Law Moot Court team and helped the team advance to the regional finals at the University of Edinburgh in Scotland. 

Ryan worked as a summer associate with a New York-based national law firm where he focused on insurance, reinsurance, and commercial litigation. He also held judicial internships with the Honorable Richard J. Leon of the United States District Court for the District of Columbia and the Honorable Thomas Kaplanes in the Dorchester Division of the Boston Municipal Court. 

Prior to law school, Ryan worked for two years as a senior analyst at a Washington, DC-based management consultancy. He also served as a graduate assistant coach for the Georgetown University Men’s Basketball team, and interned in the Office of Federal Affairs and Legislative Counsel in the Office of the Mayor of the City of Chicago. In college, Ryan was the captain of the Georgetown University Men’s Basketball team and was selected as a member of the Big East Conference’s All-Academic Team. 

Education

  • Boston College (JD)
  • Georgetown University (MA)
  • Georgetown University (BA)

Involvement

  • Board member, Georgetown Basketball Hoya Hoop Club
  • Alumni interviewer, Georgetown University

Recent Insights

News & Press

News & Press

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An article published by Massachusetts Lawyers Weekly reported that a victory secured in federal court by lawyers from Mintz and the American Civil Liberties Union is having a profound effect on the way bond hearings are conducted in deportation cases. The article included commentary from attorneys on the front lines in the Boston immigration court. One lawyer called the ruling a “breath of fresh air” and a “massive change in the law.”
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Articles published by Law360 and MassLive reported that Mintz, together with the ACLU of Massachusetts and the ACLU of New Hampshire, achieved a groundbreaking victory for immigrants’ rights when Chief U.S. District Judge Patti B. Saris ruled that the government’s practice of detaining certain immigrants by default violates both due process and the Administrative Procedure Act.

The first-of-its-kind class action lawsuit, Pereira Brito v. Barr, was filed in June on behalf of immigrants who were jailed due to flawed detention hearings in which the detainee was required to bear the burden of proof as to not being a flight risk or a danger to the community. The latest ruling holds that the class of immigrants are entitled to bond hearings at which the government bears the burden of justifying an immigrant’s detention, and at which the immigration court must consider someone’s ability to pay when setting a bond amount.

The Mintz pro bono team representing the plaintiffs in this case includes Members Susan Finegan and Susan Cohen, Special Counsel Andrew Nathanson, and Associates Mathilda McGee-Tubb, Jennifer Mather McCarthy, and Ryan Dougherty.
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Law360 covered a summary judgment argument by lawyers from Mintz and the American Civil Liberties Union in a class action lawsuit, Pereira Brito v. Barr, challenging the government’s practice of denying due process to detained immigrants.
An article published by Law360 covered a motion hearing in a class action lawsuit, Pereira Brito v. Barr, filed by Mintz, together with the ACLU of Massachusetts and the ACLU of New Hampshire, challenging the government’s practice of denying due process to detained immigrants.