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Tiffany Knapp

Associate

[email protected]

+1.617.348.4927

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Tiffany concentrates her practice on intellectual property litigation, with an emphasis on patent cases. She uses her background in computer science and mathematics to help clients in matters at the International Trade Commission and in Federal District Courts.

Prior to joining Mintz as an Associate, Tiffany was a law clerk to Clerk Joseph Stanton of the Massachusetts Appeals Court. During her last year in law school, prior to graduation, Tiffany worked as an Intern to Mintz’s IP practice. She assisted with the preparation of and research for documents to help clients strategize the use of their patent portfolio, such as a market-specific patent litigation and damages awards report. Tiffany researched effects of Supreme Court decisions and the America Invents Act on the rights and litigation strategies of patent holders, and prepared memoranda and drafted publications related to the development of standard setting organizations and their impact on patent policies.

Tiffany was involved with the New England Law Review while earning her degree at New England Law as an associate member and later as the Executive Online Editor and a published author. Tiffany was also a research assistant for Trademark matters while attending New England Law.

Education

  • New England Law (JD, magna cum laude)
  • The College of Saint Rose (BS, Computer Science and Mathematics, summa cum laude)

Viewpoints

Viewpoint
In a decision from the Patent Trial and Appeal Board (“the Board”) issued last week, the Board confirmed that the “enhanced estoppel” provision of 35 U.S.C. § 315(e)(1) applies to co-pending inter partes review (“IPR”) proceedings when a final written decision issues in a first IPR. The panel flatly rejected a Petitioner’s attempt to apply the Federal Circuit’s decision in Shaw Indus. Group, Inc. v. Automated Creel Sys., Inc., 817 F.3d 1293 (Fed. Cir. 2016) to those circumstances. 
Viewpoint

One Size Does Not Fit All When It Comes to Economic Theories Used to Determine Royalty Rates

July 1, 2019 | Blog | By Michael Renaud, James Wodarski, Aarti Shah, Matthew Galica, Tiffany Knapp

Calculating royalty rates as part of a patent dispute often becomes a hotly-disputed issue, where opposing economic theories from expert witnesses are pinned against one another.  As a litigant, care must be taken when deciding which economic theory to advance—and what facts to rely on—in support of a particular royalty rate.  Given the varying and unique nature of disputes, a singular economic approach to determining a royalty rate is impractical and, oftentimes, inappropriate. 
Viewpoint
This week, the Supreme Court left open the question of Article III standing with regards to appealing a final written decision from the Patent Trial and Appeals Board (“PTAB”) that is favorable to the patent owner. On Monday, the Supreme Court denied two petitions for certiorari that sought to appeal final written decisions (“FWD”) adverse to the petitioner in an inter partes review proceeding, in that the PTAB declines to cancel all claims under review.
Viewpoint General
The Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit (CAFC) recently issued a precedential opinion finding that a lower court had improperly incorporated an embodiment from the specification of the asserted patents into the claims.  In its decision, the CAFC reaffirmed longstanding claim construction law: the claims of a patent are interpreted in light of a specification, but not everything expressed in the specification must be read into all of the claims.
Viewpoint General

Brewery Defeats Trademark Opposition by Conservative Public Figure Phyllis Schlafly

December 18, 2018 | Blog | By Michael Graif, Tiffany Knapp

Relatives of the late conservative political activist, Phyllis Schlafly, lost their appeal to prevent the Saint Louis Brewery, LLC (“the Brewery”) from trademarking the Schlafly name in connection with various beer products on November 26, 2018. 

International Trade Commission Clarifies Domestic Industry Requirements in Favor of Patent

August 6, 2018 | Alert | By Michael Renaud, James Wodarski, Aarti Shah, Andrew DeVoogd, Matthew Galica, Tiffany Knapp

A recent International Trade Commission decision, Vacuum Cleaning Devices, improves a patent owner’s ability to demonstrate that it possesses a statutorily required “domestic industry” and can therefore obtain relief from the Commission when others infringe its intellectual property. This alert reviews the Vacuum Cleaning Devices ruling, which serves to better align the statutory purpose of the ITC’s domestic industry requirement with contemporary business practices.

Recent ITC decision clarifies and eases domestic industry burden for patent holders

July 17, 2018 | Blog | By Aarti Shah, Andrew DeVoogd, Tiffany Knapp, Matthew Galica

A recent decision by the International Trade Commission (“ITC” or the “Commission”) improves intellectual property holders’ ability to prove that they have a “domestic industry” and obtain relief for infringement from the Commission. 

ITC Updates Its Rules of Practice and Procedure to Increase Speed and Efficiency

May 11, 2018 | Blog | By Aarti Shah, Daniel Weinger, Tiffany Knapp

On Tuesday, May 8, 2018, the International Trade Commission (“ITC” or the “Commission”) published the final changes to its rules of practice and procedure. The Commission stated that the changes are intended to both modernize and simplify Commission practice as well as to increase the speed and efficiency of investigations.

Federal Circuit Affirms Delaware Alice Decision

November 16, 2017 | Blog | By Michael Renaud, Brad M Scheller, Tiffany Knapp

In issuing its precedential decision earlier this month in Two-Way Media v. Comcast, the Federal Circuit affirmed a Delaware district court determination that four data streaming patents were directed to ineligible subject matter pursuant to § 101 and the Alice framework.

Making the Sausage: Lower Courts Grapple with the Supreme Court’s TC Heartland Venue Decision

September 29, 2017 | Advisory | By Andrew DeVoogd, Anthony Faillaci, Daniel Weinger, Tiffany Knapp

The United States Supreme Court decided earlier this year that a 1957 opinion is still valid and still limits venue choices for patent infringement actions under 28 U.S.C. § 1400. See TC Heartland LLC v. Kraft Foods Group Brands LLC, 581 U.S. ___ (2017) (citing Fourco Glass Co. v. Transmirra Products Corp., 353 U.S. 222, 226 (1957)).