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Delaney M. Busch

Associate

[email protected]

+1.617.348.1837

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Delaney litigates and counsels clients regarding employment disputes on a variety of employment and labor matters before federal and state courts and administrative agencies against individual and class actions. She counsels clients on employment and labor issues, including employee handbooks and company policies, employment and separation agreements, WARN notifications, reductions in force and terminations, and internal workplace litigation. Her litigation practice includes discrimination, retaliation, and sexual harassment claims, wage and hour compliance, and non-competition and non-solicitation agreements.

Prior to joining the firm, Delaney was senior counsel for a national law firm. In this role, Delaney worked on a wide range of litigation matters in the areas of insurance defense, employment, and product liability law, including claims against manufacturers of complex commercial machinery. During law school, she served as managing editor and as a staff member for the Journal of Health and Biomedical Law

Delaney’s additional legal experience includes internships for the Honorable Judd Carhart, Associate Justice of the Massachusetts Appeals Court, and the Honorable Maureen Walsh, Presiding Justice of the Holyoke District Court.

viewpoints

Mintz’s Employment Practice will continue to monitor any future developments and legal challenges and remains ready to assist employers with compliance with the PWFA and the EEOC’s final rule.

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The Equal Employment Opportunity Commission ("EEOC") released its Proposed Enforcement Guidance on Harassment in the Workplace.  In light of recent legal developments, such as the Bostock v. Clayton County decision, which held that Title IX protects transgender persons from discrimination on the basis of sex, the #MeToo movement, the increase in remote work, changes to abortion rights, and changes in the way harassment may occur (e.g., online bullying or harassment), the proposed guidance illustrates the EEOC’s current interpretation of “existing requirements of the law” and/or its policies.  Here are some notable parts of the guidance:

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The Boston Celtics recent scandal comes at a time when workplace harassment claims (as reported by the EEOC) are on the rise, yet consensual office romantic relationships remain fairly common.  While most employees do not want their employers placing limits on whom they may seek as a romantic partner, from an employer’s viewpoint, the risks of such romances are clear, as they can easily cause real issues in the workplace: interoffice gossip, lack of productivity, reduced moral, allegations of favoritism, or worse, claims of sexual harassment. Mintz attorney Delaney Busch discusses key takeaways from this scandal and policies to minimize the employer’s risk.

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Congress has passed the Ending Forced Arbitration of Sexual Assault and Sexual Harassment Act, marking a milestone in the #MeToo movement. This legislation (which President Biden is expected to sign into law) will effectively end mandatory arbitration of sexual assault and harassment disputes. Employees will now have a choice to proceed with their claims via arbitration or in court.
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Mintz’s pro bono work for The Food Project, a nonprofit focused on youth development and reducing food insecurity, has included advising the organization on governance, real estate, employment, privacy, and litigation matters.
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The EEOC has updated guidance clarifying when COVID-19 may comprise a disability under the ADA. In a new Section N of its COVID-19 guidance entitled “COVID-19 and the Definition of ‘Disability’ Under the ADA, Rehabilitation Act, and other EEO Laws,” the EEOC focuses on when COVID-19 is, or is not, a disability, and the resulting impact on an employer’s obligation(s) under the law. Importantly, the guidance clarifies that depending on the circumstances, COVID-19 can meet the ADA’s three-part definition of “disability” (i.e., “actual disability”, “record of disability” or being “regarded as an individual with a disability”) and provide protections to applicants and employees. However, not every individual with COVID-19 will qualify as disabled. Employers must assess on a case-by-case basis to determine if the requisite standards are met. The guidance provides multiple examples of actual disabilities and regarded as disabilities to further assist employers in their assessments.
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News & Press

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Associate Delaney Busch was quoted by American Lawyer in an article discussing post-pandemic workplace and the need for employers to avoid any potential discrimination as the lines of what defines the workplace are now blurry.

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Mintz is pleased to announce that 32 attorneys have been named Massachusetts Super Lawyers and 27 attorneys have been named Massachusetts Rising Stars for 2023.

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35 Mintz attorneys have been named Massachusetts Super Lawyers and 25 Mintz attorneys have been named Massachusetts Rising Stars for 2022.

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Events & Speaking

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May
7
2024
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Recognition & Awards

  • Super Lawyers: Included on the list of Connecticut Rising Stars (2016 - 2020)

  • Super Lawyers: Included on the list of Massachusetts Rising Stars (2021-2023)

  • Phi Delta Phi – Legal Honor Society

  • Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court: Pro Bono High Honor Roll

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