Skip to main content

Jane T. Haviland

Associate

[email protected]

+1.617.348.4473

Share:

Jane’s practice focuses primarily on health care enforcement defense. Jane defends laboratories, physicians, and other clients facing government investigations and whistleblower complaints regarding alleged violations of the federal False Claims Act, the federal anti-kickback statute, the Stark law, and similar state laws. Recent victories to which Jane has contributed include:

  • Successfully defended a national laboratory against a whistleblower’s qui tam complaint.
  • Defense verdicts on summary judgment in multi-jurisdictional product liability disputes involving FDA-approved pharmaceutical drugs and assay test development.
  • Defense verdict on partial summary judgment in a bet-the-company case involving a dispute between the majority owner of a multi-billion dollar company and private equity investors.

Jane also maintains an active pro bono practice, succeeding on an appeal before an administrative law judge and securing social security benefits for her client. Jane has also appeared in family and probate court on behalf of her clients in guardianship and custody matters. Most recently, Jane’s pro bono practice has focused on social justice efforts, including participating in CORI sealing clinics and conducting research specific to assisting individuals with criminal records in understanding their public housing options.

While attending law school at night and working full time for the State Auditor’s Office, Jane was the winner of the National Moot Court New England Regional Competition and the two-time winner of the Tom C. Clark Appellate Advocacy Competition. She also served as Comment Editor of the Suffolk University Law Review. She graduated first in her class from Suffolk Law’s evening program.

Education

  • Suffolk University Law School (JD, Summa Cum Laude, Dean's List)
  • Boston University (BA, English, Cum Laude, Dean’s List)

Viewpoints

Health Care Viewpoints Thumbnail
On May 4, 2022, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for the first time issued warning letters related to products containing delta-8 tetrahydrocannabinol (delta-8 THC).  FDA has previously sent warning letters to other companies illegally selling unapproved and misbranded cannabidiol, or CBD, products that claimed to treat illness in violation of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (FD&C Act), as we have discussed in prior posts (one example here).  In a separate recent slew of CBD-related actions, it issued warning letters jointly with the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) to seven companies for selling CBD products with claims that they will treat or prevent COVID-19. This blog post will define delta-8 THC and analyze the FDA's warning letters. 
Read more
Health Care Viewpoints Thumbnail
In our annual Health Care Enforcement Year in Review & Outlook report, we examine the data and explore health care enforcement trends and likely targets of government scrutiny for 2022 and beyond.
Read more
Health Care Viewpoints Thumbnail

False Claims Act Settlements and Judgments Exceed $5.6 Billion in Fiscal Year 2021

February 2, 2022 | Blog | By Laurence Freedman, Jane Haviland

The Department of Justice announced in a February 1, 2022 press release (Press Release) that it obtained more than $5.6 billion in settlements and judgments from civil cases involving fraud and false claims in the fiscal year ending September 30, 2021 (FY2021) – the second largest annual total recovery in False Claims Act (FCA) history.
Read more
Pro Bono Viewpoint

Removing Barriers to Second Chances

January 24, 2022 | Article

Mintz initiated many pro bono projects to combat systemic racism after the murder of George Floyd, including organizing Massachusetts Criminal Offender Record Information sealing clinics with the Lawyers Clearinghouse and conducting research for a Boston-based nonprofit into how housing authorities around the country evaluate applicants with open criminal charges.
Read more
Health Care Viewpoints Thumbnail
On January 12, 2022, the co-owner of a clinical research site in Miami, Florida pleaded guilty to one count of obstruction of justice after she knowingly lied to a United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) investigator during a 2017 regulatory inspection. Olga Torres co-owned the clinical research site, Unlimited Medical Research (UMR). During its years of operation, UMR was engaged as a clinical trial site by a number of pharmaceutical companies. The conduct that led to the obstruction of justice charge stemmed from a clinical trial conducted at UMR to evaluate the safety and efficacy of a pediatric asthma drug.
Read more
Pro Bono Viewpoint
Mintz’s pro bono work for The Food Project, a nonprofit focused on youth development and reducing food insecurity, has included advising the organization on governance, real estate, employment, privacy, and litigation matters.
Read more
Podcast Viewpoint Image
In this episode of the Health Law Diagnosed podcast, members of the Mintz Health Law team discuss their health law–focused 2022 New Year’s resolutions and how they’re helping clients and colleagues navigate the continued challenges and opportunities of the current era.
Read more
Health Care Viewpoints Thumbnail

Panel Discussion Among Government Lawyers Provides Key Insights into the Future of FCA Enforcement

June 1, 2021 | Blog | By Jane Haviland, Samantha Kingsbury, Karen Lovitch

During a recent panel discussion hosted virtually by the American Bar Association, attorneys from the Department of Justice (DOJ) and certain U.S. Attorneys’ Offices known for health care fraud enforcement provided valuable insight into key areas of health care fraud enforcement, including opioid-related enforcement, kickbacks to providers involving speaker programs, and allegations involving electronic medical records (EMR) vendors.  The panel also addressed the role of private equity funds as owners and operators of companies under investigation and provided observations and recommendations about effective compliance programs and their role in resolving health care fraud matters.
Read more
Health Care Viewpoints Thumbnail
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), industry, policymakers, and consumers share a common goal of ensuring that the foods and beverages Americans eat and drink are safe, and the law has long prohibited the adulteration of a food that “contains any poisonous or deleterious substance which may render it injurious to health.” As science and technology advance, so too does our collective understanding of what that famous statutory phrase from the Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act should mean. Accordingly, FDA’s mission in overseeing the safety of the food supply is constantly subject to change. One excellent example of that is playing out in real time, because due to enhanced methods of detecting toxic elements in food, consumer interest groups and Congress have raised questions about FDA’s apparent lack of interest in looking for potential contaminants in our foods (even as available data show that the levels of some metals, like lead, have been in a general decline in the food supply as manufacturing also becomes more sophisticated and controlled and industry invests in better detection methods in the advancement of the shared goal of food safety).
Read more
Health Care Viewpoints Thumbnail
In an unexpected twist to a troubling situation that began over two years ago, U.S. Special Counsel Henry Kerner penned a letter to President Biden on March 31, 2021 questioning the Food and Drug Administration’s (FDA’s) handling of a whistleblower case that alleged improprieties surrounding compliance inspections of vaccine manufacturing facilities. Special Counsel Kerner’s letter to the President coincided with his closing of the investigation and his conclusion that the agency’s actions met “all the statutory requirements” but that they nonetheless “do not appear reasonable.” What the new leadership at the FDA’s parent Department of Health and Human Services or within Congress may do with these findings remains to be seen and certainly bears watching in the coming weeks and months. The March 31 letter was also provided to the Democratic Chairs and the ranking Republicans on the Senate Health Committee and the House Energy & Commerce Committee, which oversee FDA operations, increasing the likelihood of additional investigation and potentially public hearings, especially with congressional reauthorization of the various user fee programs looming as a must-pass action for 2022.
Read more