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Jason P.W. Halperin

Member

[email protected]

+1.212.692.6877

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Jason represents corporations and individuals in white collar investigations and matters involving the United States Attorneys’ Offices, the Securities and Exchange Commission, the New York State Attorney General’s Office, and other agencies. He is a highly seasoned trial lawyer with extensive experience handling white collar fraud cases, internal investigations, and regulatory enforcement matters. 
For more than a decade, from 2004 to 2015, Jason was a federal prosecutor in the United States Attorney’s Office for the Southern District of New York. During his tenure, he conducted 13 federal jury trials — including numerous high-profile cases — and never lost a trial. 

Jason’s most prominent cases included the prosecution of four men who plotted to blow up synagogues in Riverdale, New York, and a public corruption case involving a Yonkers City Councilwoman and her political patron, who were convicted of conspiracy, mail fraud, wire fraud, bribery, extortion, mortgage fraud, and tax fraud. Jason also handled many white-collar fraud cases and successfully prosecuted three New York state senators as well as political aides and developers for corruption crimes and tax fraud. 

In addition, Jason prosecuted many international and domestic terrorism cases and national security cases. Using a Top Secret/SCI security clearance and working with international prosecutors, law enforcement, and intelligence agencies as well as the US intelligence community, Jason prosecuted cases involving unlawful exports, international money laundering, and federal export regulations. He also supervised three FBI squads and provided approximately 50 federal law enforcement agents with legal counsel during investigations. 

After working as a federal prosecutor, Jason joined one of New York’s most prominent white-collar litigation practices. When he left the government, Jason was profiled in The New York Times. He has briefed and successfully argued numerous cases on appeal before the United States Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit. 

Early in his career, Jason worked at two international law firms and clerked for Judge Ricardo M. Urbina of the United States District Court for the District of Columbia. He also worked for New York Governor Mario Cuomo for four years, serving for two years as his principal staffer — drafting remarks for the former governor, advising him daily, traveling with him across the country, managing his campaign committee’s business affairs, and handling the press. 

Jason holds an undergraduate degree in political science from Yale and served as news editor for the Yale Daily News. At New York University School of Law, Jason was article and note editor for the Journal of Legislation and Public Policy, and received the Newman Prize for the most outstanding note. 
 

Education

  • New York University School of Law (JD)
  • Yale University (BA)

Recognition & Awards

  • Office of the Director of National Intelligence: Counterintelligence Award for Excellence awarded for international counterproliferation investigation (2013) 

Languages

- French

- Hebrew

Recent Insights

News & Press

News & Press

Mintz Members David Siegel and Jason Halperin authored this New York Law Journal article, which revisits the Autumn Jackson decision, and the subsequent 20 years of case law, for perspective on the Avenatti charges. The piece focuses on the challenges federal prosecutors face in trying to make reputational-threat based extortion charges stick.

Mintz Member Jason Halperin quoted in this article on behalf of his client, Jerry Media, saying that Olorunfemi Coker, also known as @iamFemiFactor on Twitter, had no legal claim to the meme.
Attorney Jason Halperin addresses Coker’s lawyer filing a notice of voluntary dismissal — only two days after it was filed.
Within 48 hours of initiating a copyright infringement suit against FJerry LLC, Elliot Tebele, Jerry Media and Tebele’s tequila venture JAJA Spirits for allegedly stealing a meme and posting it on the popular @fuckjerry Instagram, legal counsel for “content creator” Olorunfemi Coker filed to voluntarily dismiss the case without prejudice.
This New York Law Journal outside analysis column discusses the rapidly growing cryptocurrency space and how multiple federal and state agencies are trying to regulate these evolving markets. The column is authored by Mintz Members David Siegal and Jason Halperin. Associates Ellen Shapiro and Matthew Novian assisted in the preparation of this column.

Commentary: Enact automatic voter registration in N.Y.

January 27, 2019 | Albany Times Union

In this op-ed for the Albany Times Union, Mintz Member Jason P.W. Halperin discusses voting reform efforts in New York state and the need to take those efforts one step further to include automatic voter registration.

Reforming New York Government: It’s Time for Automatic Voter Registration

December 21, 2018 | https://www.law.com/newyorklawjournal/2018/12/21/reforming-new-york-government-its-time-for-automatic-voter-registration/ New York Law Journal

Jason P.W. Halperin, a Member and former federal prosecutor in the United States Attorney’s Office for the Southern District of New York, authored this New York Law Journal column addresses New York State’s voter registration process and possible improvements for the future to increase turnout.

Playing With Fire: When the Government and Outside Counsel Get Too Close in a Corporate Investigation

December 10, 2018 | https://www.law.com/newyorklawjournal/2018/12/07/playing-with-fire-when-the-government-and-outside-counsel-get-too-close-in-a-corporate-investigation/ New York Law Journal

This New York Law Journal special section column discusses some of the lurking pitfalls when the relationship between the government and the private law firms on which the government relies becomes a little too close. The column is authored by Mintz Members David Siegal and Jason P.W. Halperin, both of whom are former federal prosecutors from the U.S. Attorney’s Office for the Southern District of New York. Associate Peter Mulcahy assisted in the preparation of the column.
This New York Times feature article looks at Shahed Hussain and his evolution throughout the years — from asylum-seeking immigrant to petty criminal to trusted ally of government prosecutors. Mr. Hussain is back in the news as his company is at the center of a deadly limousine highway crash outside Albany, NY. Jason P.W. Halperin, a Mintz Member and former federal prosecutor in the United States Attorney’s Office for the Southern District, is referenced in the article – his quotes pulled from a jury address in a bomb-plot case in which Mr. Hussain acted as a corroborating witness.
This feature story notes that Mintz has further expanded its corporate investigations, enforcement and white collar practices with the arrival of trial and investigative Member Jason P.W. Halperin. Jason is a former Assistant United States Attorney in the Southern District of New York and focuses his practice focuses on white-collar criminal defense, internal investigations, regulatory enforcement and litigation matters.

Mintz Adds Ex-Prosecutors in Boston, New York

September 18, 2018 | American Lawyer

This feature article notes that Mintz is adding to our strong national litigation practice, which includes a stable of former prosecutors, with the arrival of former Southern District of New York prosecutor Jason P.W. Halperin and former Boston Suffolk County District Attorney Dan Conley. Both Jason and Dan are quoted throughout the article discussing their moves to Mintz.
This New York Law Journal column was co-authored by Jason P.W. Halperin and discusses the ongoing problem of “how-to” terrorism guidance on the Internet. The piece discusses a potential solution: legislation aimed at barring the publication of online materials that offer instructions on how to commit mass violence.

Curing Albany's Corruption Epidemic

May 27, 2016 | New York Law Journal

Jason. P.W. Halperin co-authored this column discussing a potential three-part fix to reduce the incentives and opportunity for future corruption in New York State government.