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Ellen Shapiro

Associate

[email protected]

+1.212.692.6208

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Ellen focuses her practice on securities litigation, including shareholder class actions and opt-outs thereto, and complex commercial litigation. She has experience taking and defending depositions, drafting briefs and other filings, as well as with internal investigations and patent matters. She represents public and private companies in a variety of industries, including life sciences.

Ellen also has an active pro bono practice. To date, she has successfully represented an individual seeking asylum and a Section 8 tenant facing eviction. She has also defended a victim of domestic violence in a civil lawsuit.

Prior to joining Mintz Levin, Ellen was a litigation associate at a leading global law firm’s New York headquarters, where she worked on securities litigation and complex commercial cases, including for Fortune 500 companies.

While attending law school, Ellen was a legal intern for a New York-based civil rights lawyer, focusing on First Amendment matters and other issues. She also served on the executive board and as a submissions editor for the Harvard Journal of Law & Gender and as a primary editor for the Harvard Human Rights Journal.

Education

  • Harvard Law School (JD)
  • Duke University (BA, magna cum laude)

Viewpoints

Viewpoint
On August 15, 2018, Judge Jed S. Rakoff of the U.S. District Court for the Southern District of New York awarded an objector to the Petrobras class settlement nearly $12,000 in attorneys’ fees (click here for the Order).  The objector had asked the Court for almost $200,000 to cover 231.7 hours of legal work. Approximately one month later, Judge Rakoff sanctioned another objector to the Petrobas class settlement (click here for the Order). In the September Order, Judge Rakoff issued a grave warning to future objectors and reminded counsel that it is the Court’s duty to “safeguard the ability of objectors to protect class members from abusive settlements while in turn protect[] class members from being abused by the objectors themselves.
Viewpoint
In a recent ruling in In re: BP p.l.c. Securities Litigation the United States District Court for the Southern District of Texas dismissed claims asserted by opt-out plaintiffs as time barred by the Exchange Act’s statute of repose pursuant to the U.S. Supreme Court’s ruling in ANZ Securities. This decision underscores that institutional investors should closely monitor the statutes of limitation and repose applicable to securities fraud claims to ensure they are not later barred from recovery.
Viewpoint
As we previously noted in this post, the United States District Court for the Northern District of California dismissed the Volkswagen Bondholder Plaintiff’s first amended complaint, with leave to amend, holding that it could not rely on the Affiliated Ute or Basic presumptions to plead reliance, and that it had not sufficiently pleaded direct reliance. On April 2, 2018, the Plaintiff filed a Second Amended Bondholder’s Class Action complaint (SAC), which added allegations: (1) of direct reliance, (2) that the bonds at issue were priced and traded on an efficient market, (3) that the defendants’ alleged fraud created the market, and (4) that Volkswagen committed fraud on the regulatory process. On September 7, 2018, the court denied the defendants motion to dismiss, and ruled that that the case may proceed to discovery, but also expressed concerns about the Plaintiffs’ ability to certify a class.
Viewpoint
In Khoja v. Orexigen Therapeutics, Inc., the Ninth Circuit clarified the “rare circumstances” when a court may review documents extraneous to the pleadings in ruling on a motion to dismiss. Given that it has become routine for securities defendants to attach numerous documents to motions to dismiss, this decision has the potential make it easier for plaintiffs to survive a motion to dismiss. Over the next several months, it will be interesting to see whether this decision survives the defendants’ petition for en banc review, and if so, whether courts outside the Ninth Circuit follow this decision to curtail the use of extraneous documents in deciding motions to dismiss.