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California Answers (Some) Pay Transparency Questions

January 11, 2023 | Blog | By Jennifer Rubin, Kevin Kim

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FTC Seeks to Ban Non-Competes: What it Means for Businesses & Employees

January 6, 2023 | Blog | By David Lagasse, Marc Aspis, Danielle Bereznay, Danielle Dillon

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New York State Enacts Pay Transparency Law

December 23, 2022 | Blog | By Evan Piercey, Corbin Carter, Michael Arnold

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2022 Roundup: New York Employment Law Legislation

December 23, 2022 | Blog | By Michelle Capezza, Corbin Carter, Evan Piercey

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NYC Proposes Rules in Advance of 2023 Automated Employment Decision Tools Law

November 4, 2022 | Blog | By Corbin Carter, Michelle Capezza, Evan Piercey

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The Boston Celtics recent scandal comes at a time when workplace harassment claims (as reported by the EEOC) are on the rise, yet consensual office romantic relationships remain fairly common.  While most employees do not want their employers placing limits on whom they may seek as a romantic partner, from an employer’s viewpoint, the risks of such romances are clear, as they can easily cause real issues in the workplace: interoffice gossip, lack of productivity, reduced moral, allegations of favoritism, or worse, claims of sexual harassment. Mintz attorney Delaney Busch discusses key takeaways from this scandal and policies to minimize the employer’s risk.
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Pay Range(r)s: A (Pocket) Field Guide to Pay Transparency

October 17, 2022 | Blog | By Paul Huston, Jennifer Rubin

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On August 19, 2022, the Departments of Health and Human Services, Treasury and Labor (the "Departments") issued final rules (the “Final Rules”) incorporating comments received on the interim rules issued in July and October 2021, clarifying some of the requirements set forth in Title I of Division BB of the Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2021 (the "Act") and the interim rules and accounting for relevant federal court rulings. In particular, the Final Rules primarily address three distinct but related topics: (1) eliminating the “rebuttable presumption standard,” (2) adding new rules regarding “downcoding,” and (3) reminding the arbitrators of their written requirements.  In this post Mintz attorneys Mark Aspis and Alden Bianchi discuss the implication of the Final rules which will be effective on October 25, 2022.
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NLRB’s Newly-Proposed Joint-Employer Standard Puts Employers on Notice

September 16, 2022 | Blog | By Richard Block, Danielle Dillon, Evan Piercey

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Will ‘Dobbs’ Advice Erode the Attorney-Client Privilege?

August 31, 2022 | Blog | By Jennifer Rubin, Greer Clem

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