Skip to main content

Employment, Labor & Benefits

Viewpoints

Filter by:

The start of a new year often means new laws for California employers to follow, and new administrative burdens for them to bear. The start of 2012 will be no exception.
Read more
This alert serves as a reminder that the New York Wage Theft Prevention Act requires employers to provide annual pay notices to all of their employees (whether full-time or part-time, exempt or non-exempt) between January 1 and February 1, 2012.
Read more
I just read a very interesting article. titled “Furor over DSM-V.”  Apparently, the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual (DSM), published by the American Psychiatric Association as a diagnostic tool), is in the process of being revised (for the fifth time, hence “V”). 
Read more
New York’s First Department – an intermediate appeals court – recently affirmed a New York County trial court decision holding that an arbitrator, not a court, should decide whether certain employment agreements at issue allowed for collective arbitration.
Read more

Staffing Company Ordered to Pay Back Wages to H-1B Employees

November 1, 2011 | Blog | By Martha Zackin

Staffing and other companies that hire nonimmigrant workers through the H-1B program must remember to pay its nonimmigrant employees the required wage rate throughout their employment, even during breaks between staffing assignments.
Read more

Leaves of Absence as Religious Accommodation

October 18, 2011 | Blog | By Martha Zackin

We previously wrote about the EEOC’s increasingly aggressive position against inflexible leave of absence policies that provide for automatic termination of employment when an employee does not or cannot return to work at the end of a specified maximum leave period, such as when the employee has exhausted available FMLA leave.
Read more
According to a press release posted on its website, the National Labor Relations Board has postponed the implementation date for its new notice-posting rule by more than two months in order to allow for enhanced education and outreach to employers, particularly those who operate small and medium sized businesses.
Read more
In a case of first impression, the United States District Court for the Second Circuit recently held that the law requires an employer to pay an employee returning from military service to a commission-based job the same total amount of pay he or she received prior to activation- the employer violates the law by returning the employee
Read more
On September 12, 2011, the California Department of Fair Employment and Housing (“DFEH”) announced its largest-ever administrative award of $846,300 (and no, that’s not a typo) against electrical supplier Acme Electric Corporation (“Acme”) for firing an employee, Mr. Charles Richard Wideman, because he had cancer.
Read more
Viewpoint Thumbnail
The New York Wage Theft Prevention Act went into effect last April.  (You can read our two previous alerts about this Act here and here).  Among other things, that Act amended Section 198(1-a) of the Labor Law to require courts to impose a liquidated damages award of 100% of the total unpaid wages found to be due – up from the previous 25% cap. 
Read more
Classifying workers as independent contractors in California- already a difficult minefield to navigate for employers– is about to get a bit harder, more convoluted and, unfortunately, more expensive. Under existing California law, a worker is presumed to be an employee, rather than an independent contractor.
Read more
In a case of first impression, the Department of Labor’s Administrative Review Board (ARB) finds that the meaning of the term “adverse action” under the whistleblower protection provisions of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act (SOX) is substantially broader than the meaning of the same term under Title VII
Read more

NLRB Poster on Employee Unionization Rights Now Available

September 16, 2011 | Blog | By Martha Zackin

We recently alerted you that beginning on November 14, 2011, union and non-union employers alike must post unionization rights notices in their workplaces. You can access that alert here.
Read more
My colleagues Ivan Blumenthal and Robert Gault just published an Alert describing a recent decision of the Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court pertaining to a challenge to a company’s imposition of certain fees and costs on service providers it classified as franchisees/independent contractors.
Read more
My colleague, Tyrone Thomas, writes that "The Governor of New York has taken a strong and outspoken stance aimed at placing those with the largest paychecks at institutional nonprofits under a microscope.
Read more
My colleagues Richard Block and David Katz just published a new alert, describing the new NLRB rule requiring private sector employers to post notices explaining employees’ unionization rights, regardless if their workplaces are unionized or union free.
Read more
Next week, millions of children around the country will return to school, which serves as a good time to remind employers that they may have to provide short-term unpaid job-protected leave to their employees seeking to participate in their children’s school-related activities.
Read more
On August 26, the Department of Justice reached a settlement with Kinro Manufacturing Inc. with regard to allegations that it “engaged in a pattern or practice of discrimination against work-authorized non-citizens in the employment eligibility verification process” by requiring certain new hires to provide proof of employment eligibility beyond that required by law.
Read more
In a short but interesting opinion by Justice Souter, sitting by designation, the First Circuit Court of Appeals held that, under Massachusetts law, the court may not enter an injunction enforcing a non-compete or other restrictive covenant which expired during the course of litigation, at least where the contract does not expressly provide for tolling of the covenant
Read more

Hurricane Irene, Wage Issues and Inclement Weather

August 26, 2011 | Blog | By Martha Zackin

An earthquake and a hurricane in one week in New York and elsewhere!? With the former, you may have had to evacuate your employees from the building; with the latter, it is becoming increasingly likely that your east coast employees may not even make into the building.
Read more
Sign up to receive email updates from Mintz.
Subscribe Now

Explore Other Viewpoints: