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Health Care Enforcement & Investigations

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In 2016, courts around the country heard cases involving a variety of False Claims Act (FCA) and other enforcement-related matters, and going forward these case law developments are expected to have an impact on both the scope of FCA liability and the means by which FCA liability can be proven at trial. 
Experienced practitioners are anecdotally aware of the growth in recent years in the volume of health care qui tam litigation. That perceived trend is validated quite graphically in the most recent Department of Justice (“DOJ”) statistics on False Claims Act filings.
On May 27, 2015, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (“CMS”) published a 653-page proposed rule affecting the thirty-nine states (plus the District of Columbia) that use managed care organizations (“MCOs”) to administer their Medicaid benefits.
In an April 22, 2015 letter to the New York State Department of Health (DOH), the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) cautioned that part of the State’s Medicaid reform program may sanction anticompetitive behavior.
In my post of April 2, Divided Supreme Court Restricts Provider Challenges to State Medicaid Rates, I wrote about the March 31st Supreme Court decision that providers may not sue in federal court over the adequacy of state Medicaid rates (See Armstrong v. Exceptional Child Ctr., Inc. (“Exceptional Child Center”).
On December 19, 2014, the Internal Revenue Service (“IRS”) issued a private letter ruling (the “Ruling”) allowing corporations that manage physician practices through a so-called “friendly physician” arrangement to treat the physician practices as members of the corporations’ consolidated tax group for U.S. federal income tax purposes.
The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) has published long-awaited changes to the Medicare Shared Savings Program (MSSP).
Fridays never seem to be slow in the health care regulatory world. On Friday, October 3rd, the HHS Office of the Inspector General (OIG) issued a highly anticipated proposed rule (the Proposed Rule) that provides amendments to the Anti-Kickback Statute’s regulatory safe harbors (AKS Safe Harbors) and adds protections for increasingly common payment practices and business arrangements under the Civil Monetary Penalty Law (CMP).
In 2013, the U.S. Department of Justice, Health and Human Services Office of Inspector General, and other federal and state agencies continued to aggressively prosecute health care fraud and related offenses through criminal, civil, and parallel proceedings.
A recent federal appeals court decision addressing pleading standards for shareholder suits under Section 11 of the Securities Act of 1933, as amended, highlights the potential dangers of giving broad assurances of legal compliance in registration statements.
Trends in health care enforcement during 2012 have been significant in reinforcing the government’s fraud investigation and recovery strategies. Health care fraud enforcement will likely intensify in the post-health reform era.

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